Pet Vaccinations: Providing Essential Protection

UnderlineFromLeft-teal

Protecting your pet from preventable animal diseases is essential to their health and the health of the general population. Though the majority of these diseases are not contagious to people, some like rabies is. Infected animals spread rabies through bites and scratches and the disease is prevalent in wildlife. Due to the threat of the rabies virus, vaccination is required by law in most states. In general, pet vaccinations control the spread of serious and contagious diseases. Furthermore, many animal-specific diseases, such as distemper in dogs and panleukopenia in cats, are only rare now because pet owners have been responsibly vaccinating their pets. Stay current on your pet's disease protection and update vaccinations or start a vaccination schedule today. Our Cincinnati animal hospital is eager to help.

Pet Vaccinations in Cincinnati: Dogs playing together

A Timeline for Your Pet's Vaccines

During the first few months of your pet's life, they should be administered their initial round of vaccines. Essentially, initial vaccinations stimulate the immune-boosting effect. Then, boosters to follow enhance protection and ensure that diseases are recognized and fought off if your pet is exposed. After booster schedules are completed during your pet's first year of life, vaccines are updated every one or three years.

A recommended vaccine schedule for dogs:

  • Distemper-parvo combination vaccine administered at 6-8 weeks of age
  • Three booster shots of distemper-parvo combo spaced 3-4 weeks apart with the final given at 16 weeks of age or after
  • Revaccination of distemper-parvo after the final booster is every one to three years (dependant on exposure risk)
  • Rabies vaccination at 12 weeks of age with a booster one year later
  • Revaccination of rabies after the final booster is every one to three years (dependant on exposure risk)
  • Bordetella (kennel cough) is administered annually and may be recommended if your dog boards
  • Canine influenza is also administered annually and may be recommended if your dog is frequently around other dogs
  • Lyme disease may be recommended for very active dogs and is administered annually after a booster is given 2-4 weeks after initial vaccination

A recommended vaccine schedule for cats:

  • Feline herpesvirus, feline calicivirus, and feline panleukopenia vaccines administered at 6-8 weeks of age
  • Three booster shots of the above vaccines administered every 3-4 weeks with the final given at 16 weeks of age or after
  • Rabies vaccination at 12-16 weeks of age with a booster one year later
  • Revaccination of rabies every three years after the booster
  • Vaccination against feline leukemia in all kittens at 8 weeks of age and a booster three to four weeks later
  • Revaccination against feline leukemia depends on exposure risk and whether your cat goes outdoors

Please keep in mind that the above timelines are only recommendations. Moreover, your pet's vaccination schedule will likely vary depending on their history and lifestyle. Please ask us for more information or to schedule a visit with our veterinarian today.

quotation-marks

Great Place! They have always taken good care of our animals. The staff is compassionate, caring and personable.

-Nick N.

I'm always sure my cats get superior care while there and it doesn't hurt that the staff volunteers to carry the kitties to the car for me!

-Kristen H.

This place is amazing. So thrilled to have found a caring, family vet!

-Jennifer K.

A wonderful place for pets and their owners.

-Gilly W.

Menu

Carey Animal Hospital

Font Resize
Contrast